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mount(8nfs)							   mount(8nfs)

Name
       mount, umount - mount and unmount a Network File System (NFS)

Syntax
       /etc/mount [ -t nfs -f -r -v ] [ options ] device directory

       /etc/umount [ -v ] directory

Description
       The  command  allows  you  to  mount  a file system or directory onto a
       directory.  Once a file system or directory has	been  mounted,	it  is
       treated as a file system.

       The argument device can have one of the following forms:

	      host:remote_name

	      remote_name@host

       The  remote_name is the name of a file system or subtree of a file sys‐
       tem that has been exported by host.  The file directory must exist  and
       must  be	 a  directory.	 It becomes the name of the newly mounted file
       system.

       General users can mount file systems with certain restrictions in addi‐
       tion to those listed in

       The command unmounts the remote file system that was previously mounted
       on the specified directory.

Options
       See the reference page for a description of the -t option.

       -f	   Fast unmount.  The -f option has no meaning for local  file
		   systems  and	 directories.  However, for remote file system
		   types (such as NFS), the -f option  causes  the  client  to
		   unmount  the	 remotely mounted file systems and directories
		   without notifying the server.  This can avoid the delay  of
		   waiting for acknowledgment from a server that is down.

       -r	   Indicates that the file system is to be mounted read only.

       -v	   Tells what did or did not happen.  (Verbose flag)

       -o options  Specifies options as a sequence of words, separated by com‐
		   mas, from the list that follows.  The default  options  are
		   as follows:
		   rw,hard,intr,retry=10,000,timeo=11,retrans=4, \
		   port=NFS_PORT,pgthresh=64
		   Defaults  for  rsize	 and wsize are set by the kernel.  The
		   NFS options are as follows:

		   bg		 If the first mount attempt fails,  retry  the
				 mount	in  the background the number of times
				 specified (the default is 10,000 times).

		   grpid	 All files or directories created in the  file
				 system being mounted are created so that they
				 inherit their parent's ID regardless  of  the
				 setting  of  the bit in their parent's direc‐
				 tory.	 Note  that  in	 the  absence  of  the
				 option,  all  files or directories created in
				 the file system inherit the group ID  of  the
				 running process.

		   hard		 Retry	the  NFS  operation  (not  the	mount)
				 request  until	 server	 responds.   The  hard
				 option	 applies after the has succeeded.  Use
				 the hard option  when	mounting  (read-write)
				 file systems.

		   intr		 Allow	hard mounted file system operations to
				 be interrupted.

		   nintr	 Disallow hard mounted file system  operations
				 from being interrupted.

		   noexec	 Binaries  cannot  be  executed from this file
				 system.

		   nosuid	 The and programs can  not  be	executed  from
				 this file system.

		   pgthresh=##	 Set the paging threshold for this file system
				 in kilobytes.

		   port=n	 Set server IP port number to n.

		   retrans=n	 Set number of NFS  operation  retransmissions
				 (not  the  mount)  to n.  The retrans= option
				 applies after the has succeeded.

		   retry=n	 Set number of mount  failure  retries	to  n.
				 The  retry=  option  applies  to the command,
				 itself.

		   ro		 Read-only.

		   rsize=n	 Set read buffer size to n bytes.

		   rw		 Read/write.

		   soft		 Return	 an  error  if	the  server  does  not
				 respond  to the NFS operation (not the mount)
				 request.  The soft option applies  after  the
				 has succeeded.	 Do not use the soft option to
				 mount (read-write) file systems.

		   timeo=n	 Set NFS timeout to n tenths of a second.

		   wsize=n	 Set write buffer size to n bytes.

		   The following options affect how quickly you see updates to
		   a file or directory that has been modified by another host.
		   Increasing these values will give you slightly better  per‐
		   formance.   Decreasing  these  values decreases the time it
		   takes for you to see modifications made  on	another	 host.
		   If  you  are	 the  only  modifier of files under this mount
		   point, you can increase these values.

		   acdirmin=n	 Hold cached directory attributes for at least
				 n seconds.  The default is 30 seconds.

		   acdirmax=n	 Hold  cached directory attributes for no more
				 than n seconds.  The default is  60  seconds.
				 The maximum value allowed is 3600.

		   acregmin=n	 Hold  cached  file  attributes for at least n
				 seconds.  The default is 3 seconds.

		   acregmax=n	 Hold cached file attributes for no more  than
				 n  seconds.   The default is 60 seconds.  The
				 maximum value allowed is 3600.

		   actimeo=n	 Set all four attributes cache timeout	values
				 to n.

		   noac		 Do not set attribute caching.	This is equiv‐
				 alent to actimeo=0.

       The option causes to run in the background if the server's daemon  does
       not  respond.   The  command attempts each request retry=n times before
       giving up.  Once the file system is mounted, each NFS request  made  in
       the  kernel  waits  timeo=n  tenths  of a second for a response.	 If no
       response arrives, the time-out is multiplied by 2 and  the  request  is
       retransmitted.

       When  retrans=n	retransmissions	 have  been sent with no reply, a soft
       mounted file system returns an error on the request and a hard  mounted
       file  system  retries  the  request.  If a hard mounted file system was
       mounted with the option, an operation within that file system  that  is
       retrying	 (for  example,	 the server is down) can be interrupted.  File
       systems that are mounted (read-write) should use the hard option.   The
       number  of  bytes  in  a	 read or write request can be set with the and
       options. The values for and must be between 512 and 8192, and be a mul‐
       tiple of 512.

       The option for is:

       -v     Tells what did or did not happen.	 (Verbose flag)

Restrictions
       If  the directory on which a file system is to be mounted is a symbolic
       link, the file system is mounted on the directory to which the symbolic
       link  refers,  rather  than  being  mounted on top of the symbolic link
       itself.

       The and commands should only be invoked by the  and  commands.	It  is
       recommended that users (and superusers) do not invoke the and commands.
       An exception to this rule is the use of the -b command in the file. The
       -b command broadcasts a message informing NFS servers that this machine
       no longer has any NFS filesystems mounted. This is  done	 in  case  the
       machine	had  crashed while it had NFS filesystems mounted. The servers
       use this information to clean up their tables.  The  command  automati‐
       cally adds the -b line to the file on NFS client systems.

Examples
       The command invokes to do its work.  A sample command is:

	    # mount -t nfs -o hard,pgthresh=100 server:/usr /usr

       To mount the remote file system onto the local directory with 1k trans‐
       fer size, type:

	    # mount -t nfs -o rsize=1024,wsize=1024 serv:/usr/src /mnt

       To mount the remote directory onto the local directory type:

	    # mount -t nfs serv:/usr/src/code /usr/src

       To hard mount a remote file system  called  onto	 the  local  directory
       type:

	    # mount -t nfs -o hard serv:/usr/src /usr/src

Files
       File system information file

       NFS-specific mount program

       NFS-specific unmount program

See Also
       getmnt(2),  mount(2),  fstab(5),	 exports(5nfs),	 mount(8),  umount(8),
       mountd(8nfs), rmtab(5nfs), nfssetup(8nfs)

								   mount(8nfs)
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