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RPM(8)				 Red Hat Linux				RPM(8)

NAME
       rpm - RPM Package Manager

SYNOPSIS
   QUERYING AND VERIFYING PACKAGES:
       rpm {-q|--query} [select-options] [query-options]

       rpm  {-V|--verify}  [select-options]  [--nodeps]	 [--nofiles] [--nomd5]
       [--noscripts]

       rpm {-K|--checksig} [--nogpg] [--nopgp] [--nomd5] PACKAGE_FILE ...

   INSTALLING, UPGRADING, AND REMOVING PACKAGES:
       rpm {-i|--install} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       rpm {-U|--upgrade} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       rpm {-F|--freshen} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       rpm {-e|--erase} [--allmatches] [--nodeps] [--noscripts] [--notriggers]
       [--repackage] [--test] PACKAGE_NAME ...

   BUILDING PACKAGES:
       rpm {-ba|-bb|-bp|-bc|-bi|-bl|-bs} [build-options] SPECFILE ...

       rpm {-ta|-tb|-tp|-tc|-ti|-tl|-ts} [build-options] TARBALL ...

       rpm {--rebuild|--recompile} SOURCEPKG ...

   MISCELLANEOUS:
       rpm {--initdb|--rebuilddb}

       rpm {--addsign|--resign} PACKAGE_FILE ...

       rpm {--querytags|--showrc}

       rpm {--setperms|--setugids} PACKAGE_NAME ...

   SELECT-OPTIONS
       [PACKAGE_NAME]	  [-a,--all]	[-f,--file FILE]    [-g,--group GROUP]
       [-p,--package PACKAGE_FILE]	[--querybynumber NUMBER]      [--trig‐
       geredby PACKAGE_NAME] [--whatprovides CAPABILITY] [--whatrequires CAPA‐
       BILITY]

   QUERY-OPTIONS
       [--changelog]  [-c,--configfiles]  [-d,--docfiles]  [--dump]  [--files‐
       bypkg]  [-i,--info] [--last] [-l,--list] [--provides] [--qf,--queryfor‐
       mat QUERYFMT]   [-R,--requires]	 [--scripts]   [-s,--state]   [--trig‐
       gers,--triggerscripts]

   INSTALL-OPTIONS
       [--allfiles]   [--badreloc]   [--excludepath OLDPATH]   [--excludedocs]
       [--force]  [-h,--hash]	[--ignoresize]	 [--ignorearch]	  [--ignoreos]
       [--includedocs]	 [--justdb]   [--nodeps]   [--noorder]	 [--noscripts]
       [--notriggers] [--oldpackage] [--percent] [--prefix  NEWPATH]  [--relo‐
       cate OLDPATH=NEWPATH]  [--repackage]  [--replacefiles]  [--replacepkgs]
       [--test]

   BUILD-OPTIONS
       [--buildroot DIRECTORY] [--clean] [--nobuild]  [--rmsource]  [--rmspec]
       [--short-circuit] [--sign] [--target PLATFORM]

DESCRIPTION
       rpm is a powerful Package Manager, which can be used to build, install,
       query, verify, update, and erase individual software packages.  A pack‐
       age  consists  of an archive of files and meta-data used to install and
       erase the archive files. The meta-data includes	helper	scripts,  file
       attributes,  and	 descriptive  information about the package.  Packages
       come in two varieties: binary packages, used to encapsulate software to
       be  installed,  and  source  packages,  containing  the source code and
       recipe necessary to produce binary packages.

       One of the following basic modes must be selected: Query, Verify,  Sig‐
       nature  Check, Install/Upgrade/Freshen, Uninstall, Build Package, Build
       Package from Tarball, Recompile Package, Initialize  Database,  Rebuild
       Database, Resign, Add Signature, Set Owners/Groups, Show Querytags, and
       Show Configuration.

   GENERAL OPTIONS
       These options can be used in all the different modes.

       -?, --help
	      Print a longer usage message then normal.

       --version
	      Print a single line containing the version number of  rpm	 being
	      used.

       --quiet
	      Print  as little as possible - normally only error messages will
	      be displayed.

       -v     Print verbose information - normally routine  progress  messages
	      will be displayed.

       -vv    Print lots of ugly debugging information.

       --rcfile FILELIST
	      Each  of	the  files  in	the  colon  separated FILELIST is read
	      sequentially by rpm for  configuration  information.   Only  the
	      first  file  in the list must exist, and tildes will be expanded
	      to   the	 value	 of   $HOME.	The   default	FILELIST    is
	      /usr/lib/rpm/rpmrc:/etc/rpmrc:~/.rpmrc.

       --pipe CMD
	      Pipes the output of rpm to the command CMD.

       --dbpath DIRECTORY
	      Use  the	database  in  DIRECTORY	 rathen	 than the default path
	      /var/lib/rpm

       --root DIRECTORY
	      Use the system rooted at DIRECTORY  for  all  operations.	  Note
	      that  this  means	 the  database	will be read or modified under
	      DIRECTORY and any %pre or %post scriptlet(s)  are	 run  after  a
	      chroot(2) to DIRECTORY.

   INSTALL AND UPGRADE OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm install command is

       rpm {-i|--install} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       This installs a new package.

       The general form of an rpm upgrade command is

       rpm {-U|--upgrade} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       This  upgrades  or  installs the package currently installed to a newer
       version.	 This is the same as install, except all other	version(s)  of
       the package are removed after the new package is installed.

       rpm {-F|--freshen} [install-options] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       This  will  upgrade  packages, but only if an earlier version currently
       exists. The PACKAGE_FILE may be specified as an ftp  or	http  URL,  in
       which  case  the package will be downloaded before being installed. See
       FTP/HTTP OPTIONS for information on rpm's internal ftp and http	client
       support.

       --allfiles
	      Installs	or  upgrades  all  the missingok files in the package,
	      regardless if they exist.

       --badreloc
	      Used with --relocate, permit relocations on all file paths,  not
	      just  those  OLDPATH's included in the binary package relocation
	      hint(s).

       --excludepath OLDPATH
	      Don't install files whose name begins with OLDPATH.

       --excludedocs
	      Don't install any files which are marked as documentation (which
	      includes man pages and texinfo documents).

       --force
	      Same as using --replacepkgs, --replacefiles, and --oldpackage.

       -h, --hash
	      Print  50	 hash  marks  as the package archive is unpacked.  Use
	      with -v|--verbose for a nicer display.

       --ignoresize
	      Don't check mount file systems for sufficient disk space	before
	      installing this package.

       --ignorearch
	      Allow installation or upgrading even if the architectures of the
	      binary package and host don't match.

       --ignoreos
	      Allow installation or upgrading even if the operating systems of
	      the binary package and host don't match.

       --includedocs
	      Install documentation files. This is the default behavior.

       --justdb
	      Update only the database, not the filesystem.

       --nodeps
	      Don't  do	 a  dependency	check before installing or upgrading a
	      package.

       --noorder
	      Don't reorder the packages for an install. The list of  packages
	      would normally be reordered to satisfy dependancies.

       --noscripts

       --nopre

       --nopost

       --nopreun

       --nopostun
	      Don't  execute  the scriptlet of the same name.  The --noscripts
	      option is equivalent to

	      --nopre --nopost --nopreun --nopostun

	      and turns off the execution of the  corresponding	 %pre,	%post,
	      %preun, and %postun scriptlet(s).

       --notriggers

       --notriggerin

       --notriggerun

       --notriggerpostun
	      Don't  execute  any  trigger  scriptlet  of the named type.  The
	      --notriggers option is equivalent to

	      --notriggerin --notriggerun --notriggerpostun

	      and turns off execution of the corresponding %triggerin,	%trig‐
	      gerun, and %triggerpostun scriptlet(s).

       --oldpackage
	      Allow an upgrade to replace a newer package with an older one.

       --percent
	      Print  percentages  as  files  are unpacked from the package ar‐
	      chive.  This is intended to make rpm  easy  to  run  from	 other
	      tools.

       --prefix NEWPATH
	      For  relocateable binary packages, translate all file paths that
	      start with the installation prefix  in  the  package  relocation
	      hint(s) to NEWPATH.

       --relocate OLDPATH=NEWPATH
	      For  relocatable	binary packages, translate all file paths that
	      start with OLDPATH in the package relocation hint(s) to NEWPATH.
	      This  option  can be used repeatedly if several OLDPATH's in the
	      package are to be relocated.

       --repackage
	      Re-package the files before erasing.  The	 previously  installed
	      package	will   be  named  according  to	 the  macro  %_repack‐
	      age_name_fmt and will be created in the directory named  by  the
	      macro %_repackage_dir (default value is /var/tmp).

       --replacefiles
	      Install  the  packages  even  if	they replace files from other,
	      already installed, packages.

       --replacepkgs
	      Install the packages even if some of them are already  installed
	      on this system.

       --nobuild
	      Do  not  install the package, simply check for and report poten‐
	      tial conflicts.

   QUERY OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm query command is

       rpm {-q|--query} [select-options] [query-options]

       You may specify the format that package information should  be  printed
       in. To do this, you use the
	{--qf|--queryformat}  QUERYFMT option, followed by the QUERYFMT format
       string.	Query formats are modifed versions of the  standard  printf(3)
       formatting.  The format is made up of static strings (which may include
       standard C character escapes for	 newlines,  tabs,  and	other  special
       characters)  and	 printf(3)  type formatters.  As rpm already knows the
       type to print, the type specifier must be omitted however, and replaced
       by the name of the header tag to be printed, enclosed by {} characters.
       Tag names are case insesitive, and the RPMTAG_ portion of the tag  name
       may be omitted as well.

       Alternate  output  formats  may	be requested by following the tag with
       :typetag.  Currently, the following types are supported:	 octal,	 date,
       shescape,  perms, fflags, and depflags.	For example, to print only the
       names of the packages queried, you could	 use  %{NAME}  as  the	format
       string.	To print the packages name and distribution information in two
       columns, you could use %-30{NAME}%{DISTRIBUTION}.   rpm	will  print  a
       list  of	 all  of  the  tags it knows about when it is invoked with the
       --querytags argument.

       There are two subsets of options for querying: package  selection,  and
       information selection.

   PACKAGE SELECTION OPTIONS:
       PACKAGE_NAME
	      Query installed package named PACKAGE_NAME.

       -a, --all
	      Query all installed packages.

       -f, --file FILE
	      Query package owning FILE.

       -g, --group GROUP
	      Query packages with the group of GROUP.

       -p, --package PACKAGE_FILE
	      Query  an	 (uninstalled) package PACKAGE_FILE.  The PACKAGE_FILE
	      may be specified as an ftp or http style URL, in which case  the
	      package  header  will  be	 downloaded and queried.  See FTP/HTTP
	      OPTIONS for information on rpm's internal ftp  and  http	client
	      support.	The PACKAGE_FILE argument(s), if not a binary package,
	      will be interpreted as an ASCII package manifest.	 Comments  are
	      permitted, starting with a '#', and each line of a package mani‐
	      fest file may include white space	 seperated  glob  expressions,
	      including	 URL's	with  remote  glob  expressions,  that will be
	      expanded to paths that are substituted in place of  the  package
	      manifest as additional PACKAGE_FILE arguments to the query.

       --querybynumber NUMBER
	      Query  the NUMBERth database entry directly; this is useful only
	      for debugging.

       --specfile SPECFILE
	      Parse and query SPECFILE as if it were a package.	 Although  not
	      all the information (e.g. file lists) is available, this type of
	      query permits rpm to be used to extract  information  from  spec
	      files without having to write a specfile parser.

       --triggeredby PACKAGE_NAME
	      Query packages that are triggered by package(s) PACKAGE_NAME.

       --whatprovides CAPABILITY
	      Query all packages that provide the CAPABILITY capability.

       --whatrequires CAPABILITY
	      Query all packages that requires CAPABILITY for proper function‐
	      ing.

   PACKAGE QUERY OPTIONS:
       --changelog
	      Display change information for the package.

       -c, --configfiles
	      List only configuration files (implies -l).

       -d, --docfiles
	      List only documentation files (implies -l).

       --dump Dump file information as follows:

	      path size mtime md5sum mode owner group isconfig isdoc rdev symlink

       This option must be used with at least one of -l, -c, -d.

       --filesbypkg
	      List all the files in each selected package.

       -i, --info
	      Display  package	information,  including	 name,	version,   and
	      description.  This uses the --queryformat if one was specified.

       --last Orders  the package listing by install time such that the latest
	      packages are at the top.

       -l, --list
	      List files in package.

       --provides
	      List capabilities this package provides.

       -R, --requires
	      List packages on which this package depends.

       --scripts
	      List the package specific scriptlet(s) that are used as part  of
	      the installation and uninstallation processes.

       -s, --state
	      Display  the  states  of files in the package (implies -l).  The
	      state of each file is one of normal, not installed, or replaced.

       --triggers, --triggerscripts
	      Display the trigger scripts, if any, which are contained in  the
	      package.

   VERIFY OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm verify command is

       rpm  {-V|--verify}  [select-options]  [--nodeps]	 [--nofiles] [--nomd5]
       [--noscripts]

       Verifying a package compares information about the installed  files  in
       the  package  with  information	about the files taken from the package
       metadata stored in the rpm database.   Among  other  things,  verifying
       compares	 the size, MD5 sum, permissions, type, owner and group of each
       file.  Any discrepencies are displayed.	Files that were not  installed
       from  the package, for example, documentation files excluded on instal‐
       lation using the "--excludedocs" option, will be silently ignored.

       The package selection options are the  same  as	for  package  querying
       (including  package  manifest  files as arguments).  Other options that
       can be used only in verify mode are:

       --nodeps
	      Don't verify dependencies.

       --nofiles
	      Don't verify files.

       --nomd5
	      Don't verify file MD5 checksums.

       --noscripts
	      Don't execute the %verifyscript scriptlet (if any).

       The format of the output is a string of 8 characters,  a	 possible  "c"
       denoting	 a  configuration  file, and then the file name. Each of the 8
       characters denotes the result of a comparison of	 attribute(s)  of  the
       file  to	 the  value of those attribute(s) recorded in the database.  A
       single "." (period) means the test passed, while a  single  "?"	 indi‐
       cates  the  test	 could not be performed (e.g. file permissions prevent
       reading). Otherwise, the (mnemonically  emBoldened)  character  denotes
       failure of the corresponding --verify test:

       S file Size differs

       M Mode differs (includes permissions and file type)

       5 MD5 sum differs

       D Device major/minor number mis-match

       L readLink(2) path mis-match

       U User ownership differs

       G Group ownership differs

       T mTime differs

   SIGNATURE CHECKING
       The general form of an rpm signature check command is

       rpm --checksig [--nogpg] [--nopgp] [--nomd5] PACKAGE_FILE ...

       This  checks  the  GPG  signature of package PACKAGE_FILE to ensure its
       integrity and origin. GPG configuration information is read  from  con‐
       figuration files.  See the section on GPG SIGNATURES for details.

   ERASE OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm erase command is

       rpm {-e|--erase} [--allmatches] [--nodeps] [--noscripts] [--notriggers]
       [--repackage] [--test] PACKAGE_NAME ...

       The following options may also be used:

       --allmatches
	      Remove all versions of the  package  which  match	 PACKAGE_NAME.
	      Normally	an  error  is  issued if PACKAGE_NAME matches multiple
	      packages.

       --nodeps
	      Don't check dependencies before uninstalling the packages.

       --noscripts

       --nopreun

       --nopostun
	      Don't execute the scriptlet of the same name.   The  --noscripts
	      option during package erase is equivalent to

	      --nopreun --nopostun

	      and  turns  off  the  execution of the corresponding %preun, and
	      %postun scriptlet(s).

       --notriggers

       --notriggerun

       --notriggerpostun
	      Don't execute any trigger scriptlet  of  the  named  type.   The
	      --notriggers option is equivalent to

	      --notriggerun --notriggerpostun

	      and  turns  off  execution  of the corresponding %triggerun, and
	      %triggerpostun scriptlet(s).

       --repackage
	      Re-package the files before erasing.  The	 previously  installed
	      package	will   be  named  according  to	 the  macro  %_repack‐
	      age_name_fmt and will be created in the directory named  by  the
	      macro %_repackage_dir (default value is /var/tmp).

       --test Don't  really  uninstall	anything, just go through the motions.
	      Useful in conjunction with the -vv option for debugging.

   BUILD OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm build command is

       rpm {-bSTAGE|-tSTAGE} [build-options] FILE ...

       The argument used is -b if a spec file is being used to build the pack‐
       age  and	 -t  if	 rpm should look inside of a (possibly compressed) tar
       file for the spec file to use. After the first argument, the next char‐
       acter (STAGE) specifies the stages of building and packaging to be done
       and is one of:

       -ba    Build binary and source packages (after doing the %prep, %build,
	      and %install stages).

       -bb    Build  a	binary	package	 (after	 doing	the %prep, %build, and
	      %install stages).

       -bp    Executes the "%prep" stage from the  spec	 file.	Normally  this
	      involves unpacking the sources and applying any patches.

       -bc    Do  the "%build" stage from the spec file (after doing the %prep
	      stage).  This generally involves the equivalent of a "make".

       -bi    Do the "%install" stage from the	spec  file  (after  doing  the
	      %prep  and  %build stages).  This generally involves the equiva‐
	      lent of a "make install".

       -bl    Do a "list check".  The "%files" section from the spec  file  is
	      macro  expanded,	and  checks  are made to verify that each file
	      exists.

       -bs    Build just the source package.

       The following options may also be used:

       --buildroot DIRECTORY
	      When building a package, override the BuildRoot tag with	direc‐
	      tory DIRECTORY.

       --clean
	      Remove the build tree after the packages are made.

       --nobuild
	      Do  not  execute	any  build stages. Useful for testing out spec
	      files.

       --rmsource
	      Remove the sources after the build (may also be used standalone,
	      e.g. "rpm --rmsource foo.spec").

       --rmspec
	      Remove  the  spec	 file after the build (may also be used stand‐
	      alone, eg. "rpm --rmspec foo.spec").

       --short-circuit
	      Skip straight to specified stage (i.e., skip all stages  leading
	      up to the specified stage).  Only valid with -bc and -bi.

       --sign Embed a GPG signature in the package. This signature can be used
	      to verify the integrity and the origin of the package.  See  the
	      section on GPG SIGNATURES for configuration details.

       --target PLATFORM
	      When  building the package, interpret PLATFORM as arch-vendor-os
	      and set the  macros  %_target,  %_target_arch,  and  %_target_os
	      accordingly.

   REBUILD AND RECOMPILE OPTIONS
       There are two other ways to invoke building with rpm:

       rpm {--rebuild|--recompile} SOURCEPKG ...

       When  invoked this way, rpm installs the named source package, and does
       a prep, compile and install.   In  addition,  --rebuild	builds	a  new
       binary  package.	 When  the build has completed, the build directory is
       removed (as in --clean) and the the sources and spec file for the pack‐
       age are removed.

   SIGNING A PACKAGE
       rpm {--addsign|--resign} PACKAGE_FILE ...

       The  --addsign  option  generates  and  inserts new signatures for each
       package.	 Any existing signatures will be discarded.

       The --resign option generates and appends  signatures  for  the	listed
       packages while preserving the existing signatures.

   GPG SIGNATURES
       In  order  to  use the signature feature, rpm must be configured to run
       GPG and be able to find a public key ring with Red Hat (or  other  ven‐
       dor)  public  keys. By default, rpm uses the same conventions as GPG to
       find key rings, namely the $GPGPATH environment variable.  If your  key
       rings  are  not	located where GPG expects them to be, you will need to
       configure the macro %_gpg_path to be the location of the GPG key	 rings
       to use.

       If  you	want to be able to sign packages you create yourself, you also
       need to create your own public and secret key pair (see	the  GPG  man‐
       ual). You will also need to configure the macros

       %_signature
	      The signature type.  Right now only gpg and pgp are supported.

       %_gpg_name
	      The  name	 of  the "user" whose key you wish to use to sign your
	      packages.

       When building packages you then add --sign to  the  command  line.  You
       will  be	 prompted for your pass phrase, and your package will be built
       and signed.  For example, to be able to use GPG to sign packages as the
       user   "John   Doe  <jdoe@foo.com>"  from  the  key  rings  located  in
       /etc/rpm/.gpg using the executable /usr/bin/gpg you would include

       %_signature gpg
       %_gpg_path /etc/rpm/.gpg
       %_gpg_name John Doe <jdoe@foo.com>
       %_gpgbin /usr/bin/gpg

       in a macro configuration file. Use /etc/rpm/macros for per-system  con‐
       figuration and ~/.rpmmacros for per-user configuration.

   REBUILD DATABASE OPTIONS
       The general form of an rpm rebuild database command is

       rpm {--initdb|--rebuilddb} [-v] [--dbpath DIRECTORY] [--root DIRECTORY]

       Use  --initdb  to create a new database, use --rebuilddb to rebuild the
       database indices from the installed package headers.

   SHOWRC
       The command

       rpm --showrc

       shows the values rpm will use for all of the options are currently  set
       in rpmrc and macros configuration file(s).

   FTP/HTTP OPTIONS
       rpm  can	 act  as  an  FTP  and/or  HTTP client so that packages can be
       queried or installed from the internet.	 Package  files	 for  install,
       upgrade,	 and query operations may be specified as an ftp or http style
       URL:

       ftp://USER:PASSWORD@HOST:PORT/path/to/package.rpm

       If the :PASSWORD portion is omitted, the password will be prompted  for
       (once  per user/hostname pair). If both the user and password are omit‐
       ted, anonymous ftp is used.  In all cases, passive (PASV) ftp transfers
       are performed.

       rpm allows the following options to be used with ftp URLs:

       --ftpproxy HOST
	      The  host HOST will be used as a proxy server for all ftp trans‐
	      fers, which allows users to ftp through firewall machines	 which
	      use  proxy systems. This option may also be specified by config‐
	      uring the macro %_ftpproxy.

       --ftpport HOST
	      The TCP PORT number to use for the ftp connection on  the	 proxy
	      ftp  server instead of the default port. This option may also be
	      specified by configuring the macro %_ftpport.

       rpm allows the following options to be used with http URLs:

       --httpproxy HOST
	      The host HOST will be used as a proxy server for all http trans‐
	      fers. This option may also be specified by configuring the macro
	      %_httpproxy.

       --httpport PORT
	      The TCP PORT number to use for the http connection on the	 proxy
	      http server instead of the default port. This option may also be
	      specified by configuring the macro %_httpport.

FILES
       /usr/lib/rpm/rpmrc

       /etc/rpmrc

       ~/.rpmrc

       /usr/lib/rpm/macros

       /etc/rpm/macros

       ~/.rpmmacros

       /var/lib/rpm/Conflictname

       /var/lib/rpm/Basenames

       /var/lib/rpm/Group

       /var/lib/rpm/Name

       /var/lib/rpm/Packages

       /var/lib/rpm/Providename

       /var/lib/rpm/Requirename

       /var/lib/rpm/Triggername

       /var/tmp/rpm*

SEE ALSO
       popt(3),

       rpm2cpio(8),

       rpmbuild(8),

       http://www.rpm.org/

AUTHORS
       Marc Ewing <marc@redhat.com>

       Jeff Johnson <jbj@redhat.com>

       Erik Troan <ewt@redhat.com>

Red Hat, Inc.			 06 June 2001				RPM(8)
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