slapd-tcl man page on OpenDarwin

Man page or keyword search:  
man Server   3202 pages
apropos Keyword Search (all sections)
Output format
OpenDarwin logo
[printable version]

SLAPD-TCL(5)							  SLAPD-TCL(5)

NAME
       slapd-tcl - Tcl backend to slapd

SYNOPSIS
       /etc/openldap/slapd.conf

DESCRIPTION
       The  Tcl backend to slapd(8) works by embedding a Tcl(3tcl) interpreter
       into slapd(8).  Any tcl database	 section  of  the  configuration  file
       slapd.conf(5) must then specify what Tcl script to use.

       This backend is experimental.

WARNING
       This  backend's	calling	 conventions  have changed since OpenLDAP 2.0.
       Previously, the 2nd argument to the procs was a message ID.   Now  they
       are  an "operation ID" string.  Also, proc abandon now gets a new aban‐
       donid argument.

CONFIGURATION
       These slapd.conf options apply to the TCL backend database.   That  is,
       they  must  follow a "database tcl" line and come before any subsequent
       "backend" or "database" lines.  Other database options are described in
       the slapd.conf(5) manual page.

       scriptpath <filename.tcl>
	      The full path to the tcl script used for this database.

       search <proc>
       add <proc>
       delete <proc>
       modify <proc>
       bind <proc>
       unbind <proc>
       modrdn <proc>
       compare <proc>
       abandon <proc>
	      The  procs  for each ldap function.  They refer to the tcl procs
	      in the `scriptpath' script that handles them.

       tclrealm <interpreter name>
	      This is one of the biggest pluses of using the tcl backend.  The
	      realm  lets you group several databases to the same interpreter.
	      This basically means they share the same	global	variables  and
	      proc  space.  So global variables, as well as all the procs, are
	      callable between databases.  If no tclrealm is specified, it  is
	      put into the "default" realm.

Variables passed to the procs
       abandon { action opid suffix abandonid }
	      action	- Always equal to ABANDON.
	      opid	- The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix	- List of suffix(es) associated with the
			  call.	 Each one is an entry in a tcl
			  formatted list (surrounded by {}'s).
	      abandonid - The opid of the operation to abandon.

       add { action opid suffix entry }
	      action - Always equal to ADD.
	      opid   - The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix - List of suffix(es), as above.
	      entry  - Full entry to add. Each "type: val" is
		       an element in a tcl formatted list.

       bind { action opid suffix dn method cred_len cred }
	      action   - Always equal to BIND.
	      opid     - The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix   - List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn       - DN being bound to.
	      method   - One of the ldap authentication methods.
	      cred_len - Length of cred.
	      cred     - Credentials being used to authenticate,
			 according to RFC.  If this value is empty,
			 then it should be considered an anonymous
			 bind (??)

       compare { action opid suffix dn ava_type ava_value }
	      action	- Always equal to COMPARE.
	      opid	- The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix	- List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn	- DN for compare.
	      ava_type	- Type for comparison.
	      ava_value - Value to compare.

       delete { action opid suffix dn }
	      action	- Always equal to DELETE.
	      opid	- The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix	- List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn	- DN to delete.

       modify { action opid suffix dn mods }
	      action - Always equal to MODIFY.
	      opid   - The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix - List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn     - DN to modify.
	      mods   - Tcl list of modifications.
		       The list is formatted in this way:

		       {
			 { {op: type} {type: val} }
			 { {op: type} {type: val} {type: val} }
			 ...
		       }

		       Newlines are not present in the actual var,
		       they are present here for clarification.
		       "op" is the type of modification
		       (ADD, DELETE, REPLACE).

       modrdn { action opid suffix dn newrdn deleteoldrdn }
	      action - Always equal to MODRDN.
	      opid   - The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix - List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn     - DN whose RDN is being renamed.
	      newrdn - New RDN.
	      deleteoldrdn - Boolean stating whether or not the
		       old RDN should be removed after being renamed.

       search  {  action opid suffix base scope deref sizelimit timelimit fil‐
       terstr attrsonly attrlist }
	      action	- Always equal to SEARCH.
	      opid	- The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix	- List of suffix(es), as above.
	      base	- Base for this search.
	      scope	- Scope of search, ( 0 | 1 | 2 ).
	      deref	- Alias dereferencing ( 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 ).
	      sizelimit - Maximum number of entries to return.
	      timelimit - Time limit for search.
	      filterstr - Filter string as sent by the requester.
	      attrsonly - Boolean for whether to list only the
			  attributes, and not values as well.
	      attrlist	- Tcl list if to retrieve.

       unbind { action opid suffix dn }
	      action - Always equal to UNBIND.
	      opid   - The opid of this ldap operation.
	      suffix - List of suffix(es), as above.
	      dn     - DN to unbind.

       An opid (operation ID) is a "connection ID/message ID" string identify‐
       ing an operation.

Return Method and Syntax
       There  are only 2 return types.	All procs must return a result to show
       status of the operation.	 The result is in this form:

	      { RESULT {code: <integer>} {matched: <partialdn>}
		{info: <string>} {} }

       This is best accomplished with this type of tcl code

		lappend ret_val "RESULT"
		lappend ret_val "code: 0"
		lappend ret_val ""
		return $ret_val

       The final empty string (item in list) is necessary to point to the  end
       of  list.   The `code', `matched', and `info' values are not necessary,
       and default values are given if not specified.	The  `code'  value  is
       usually an LDAP error in decimal notation from ldap.h.  The `info', may
       be sent back to the client, depending on the  function.	 In  the  bind
       proc,  LDAP  uses  the  value  of `code' to indicate whether or not the
       authentication is acceptable.

       The other type of return is for searches.  It is similar format to  the
       shell  backend return (as is most of the syntax here).  Its format fol‐
       lows:

	      {dn: o=Company, c=US} {attr: val} {objectclass: val} {}
	      {dn: o=CompanyB, c=US} {attr: val} {objectclass: val} {}

       Again, newlines are for visual purposes here.  Also note the {} marking
       the  end	 of the entry (same effect as a newline in ldif format).  Here
       is some example code again, showing a full search proc example.

	      # Note that `args' lets you lump all possible args
	      # into one var, used here for simplicity of example
	      proc ldap:search { args } {
		# ...perform some operations...

		lappend ret_val "dn: $rdn,$base"
		lappend ret_val "objectclass: $objcl"
		lappend ret_val "sn: $rdn"
		lappend ret_val "mail: $email"
		lappend ret_val ""
		# Now setup the result
		lappend ret_val "RESULT"
		lappend ret_val "code: 0"
		lappend ret_val ""
		return $ret_val
	      }

       NOTE: Newlines in the return value  is  acceptable  in  search  entries
       (i.e. when returning base64 encoded binary entries).

Builtin Commands and Variables
       ldap:debug <msg>
	      Allows  you  to  send  debug  messages through OpenLDAP's native
	      debugging system, this is sent as a LDAP_DEBUG_ANY and  will  be
	      logged.  Useful for debugging scripts or logging bind failures.

FILES
       /etc/openldap/slapd.conf
	      default slapd configuration file

SEE ALSO
       slapd.conf(5), slapd(8), Tcl(3tcl).

OpenLDAP 2.1.X			  RELEASEDATE			  SLAPD-TCL(5)
[top]

List of man pages available for OpenDarwin

Copyright (c) for man pages and the logo by the respective OS vendor.

For those who want to learn more, the polarhome community provides shell access and support.

[legal] [privacy] [GNU] [policy] [cookies] [netiquette] [sponsors] [FAQ]
Tweet
Polarhome, production since 1999.
Member of Polarhome portal.
Based on Fawad Halim's script.
...................................................................
Vote for polarhome
Free Shell Accounts :: the biggest list on the net